NATIONAL RECYCLING GUIDELINES WELCOMED – A NECESSARY STEP TOWARDS CONSISTENCY AND HIGH QUALITY RECYCLING

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

The Resource Association today welcomed the publication by WRAP of the first set of National Recycling Guidelines aimed at providing clear lists of what can and cannot be accepted for recycling in kerbside recycling collections.

The Association supported WRAP in the production of the Guidelines and has been actively working on the project during 2015 and 2016, including extensive engagement with materials trade bodies and individual reprocessors across all the main material streams. The Association’s work for WRAP was primarily carried out by Peter Mansfield Associates, a well-known materials recycling expert with an extensive track record of industry experience in local government and the recycling industry.

Commenting on the release of the Guidelines today, Resource Association Chief Executive Ray Georgeson said:

“We were pleased to be able to work with WRAP on this important project and warmly welcome the publication of the Guidelines. They are a necessary next step in the journey towards greater consistency in household recycling collections and in the essential task of improving the quality of recyclate by reducing contamination. I commend them to local authorities and industry alike and I hope they are rapidly adopted in the coming months. I’d also like to publicly thank Peter Mansfield for the tremendous effort he personally put into delivering the foundations of these Guidelines and all the industry partners who have collaborated so well on the project.”

“The publication of these Guidelines is timely, in that the continuing stress that contamination in recyclate places upon UK reprocessors has not diminished in recent times. Their adoption would be a low-cost intervention with the potential for a strong positive impact, particularly if they were to be combined with another low-cost intervention around improving the transparency to the public of what actually happens to recycling and its end destination. Together these two low-cost activities could give English recycling the lift it needs towards the continuing challenge of reaching the 50% recycling target.”